The age old concept although very basic behind air conditioning was applied in ancient Egypt, the idea was to hang reeds in windows with water trickling down, thus the evaporation of water cooled the air blowing through the window, having said that this process also made the air more humid.

 

Ancient romans used water from aqueducts; this was circulated through the walls of certain houses to cool them down, and in medieval Persia the technique used were cisterns and wind-towers to cool buildings during the hot summer months.

 

The age old concept although very basic behind air conditioning was applied in ancient Egypt, the idea was to hang reeds in windows with water trickling down, thus the evaporation of water cooled the air blowing through the window, having said that this process also made the air more humid.

 

Ancient romans used water from aqueducts; this was circulated through the walls of certain houses to cool them down, and in medieval Persia the technique used were cisterns and wind-towers to cool buildings during the hot summer months.

 

Modern air conditioning evolved from advances in chemistry during the 19th century, when Willis Haviland Carrier, invented the first large-scale electrical air conditioning in 1911.  It is surprising that air conditioning has been around for so long and is still not used to its full potential in the UK.

 

Air conditioning comes in all shapes and sizes, it can be an appliance, system, or machine and is designed to change the air temperature and humidity within an area, and typically uses a refrigeration cycle and sometimes using evaporation.

 

Air conditioning is the process of altering the properties of air to more favourable conditions and can refer to any form of technological cooling, heating, ventilation that modifies the condition of air.  Although many homes in the UK do not have air conditioning as the ‘norm’ more and more homes are now investing in <a href=“http://www.climachill.co.uk” target=“_blank”>portable air conditioning units</a>.

 

The way air conditioning works can be a mystery to so many people we understand how boilers make hot water and move it around your home in pipes, but very often do not understand how air conditioning systems make nice cold, dehumidified air.

 

 

<a href=“http://www.climachill.co.uk” target=“_blank”>portable air conditioners</a>is an ever growing market, thus get into the mind-set that these units are a machine that takes heat from your house and deposits it outside, all air conditioners work on the same principle, by using five interconnected parts, such as refrigerant, compressor, condenser, expansion valve, and evaporator coil.

 

There are of course many types of air conditioning systems, that are used in the home this will include window, ductless and central air conditioning systems, also a <a href=“http://www.climachill.co.uk” target=“_blank”>portable air conditioner</a>which is sometimes a preferred option for those wanting to avoid installation.

 

It is not too important to understand the workings of air conditioning as long as it does the job, but some are inquisitive by nature and want to know ‘how stuff works’ just think of the refrigerant as ‘blood’ pumping through the air conditioner’s system. 

 

This changes from gas vapour to liquid and as it collects heat from your home it then rejects that heat to the outside.  Refrigerant has a very low boiling point meaning that it changes from a liquid to a vapour at low temperatures.

 

A spokesman for Climachill air conditioning specialists located on the South Coast of the UK said, “the compressor which is like a ‘heart’ of any system pumping the refrigerant through all the components in a big loop, and it is important to have a top quality compressor, of course our <a href=“http://www.climachill.co.uk” target=“_blank”>portable air conditioning</a>do have a Hitachi compressor which maximises output yet minimises noise, the compressor is the main working part of an air conditioning system and has to be right, check us out online and choose the best”.

 

For further information visit:  www.climachill.co.uk