Honolulu, HI (cheap-hawaii-moving.com) October 16, 2012 – One visit to Hawaii can create an impression of absolute perfection. According to the Hawaii Tourism Authority, the end of August marked a strong travel season during the Summer of 2012. The gorgeous scenery can lead you to believe the island lifestyle is one you can easily get used to through your golden years. However, a lesser known aspect of Hawaiian culture can tarnish your view of paradise- the inherent local resentment towards foreign residents.

Honolulu, HI (cheap-hawaii-moving.com) October 16, 2012 – One visit to Hawaii can create an impression of absolute perfection. According to the Hawaii Tourism Authority, the end of August marked a strong travel season during the Summer of 2012. The gorgeous scenery can lead you to believe the island lifestyle is one you can easily get used to through your golden years. However, a lesser known aspect of Hawaiian culture can tarnish your view of paradise- the inherent local resentment towards foreign residents. The closed-cycle economy of Hawaii means limited resources, limited jobs, and a higher cost of living. Cultural conflicts and other forms of localism may make it harder to integrate yourself as a Hawaii resident, opposed to when you're just passing through as a tourist. Paradise is nice for a little while, but is it really a suitable place to live for someone from the mainland?

Through the month of August, the HTA reports 5.8 million guests visited the island state, contributing to the $1.6 billion growth in total visitor expenditures. HTA's 2009 Resident Sentiment Survey shows the locals have a favorable attitude towards tourism's effect on the economy and job creation. However, the large influx of visitors isn't entirely welcomed with open arms. The same study also reveals that natives see a negative impact on the sustenance of Hawaii's natural resources, the preservation of their culture, and their overall safety.

No matter how many years you spend in Hawaii, if you are not native to the islands, you will most likely be seen as “haole.” This is not a term of endearment. In fact, the pejorative has been used as far back as the 1800's, designated to foreigners who decide to make Hawaii their home, especially those of Caucasian descent. Haole are loud and obnoxious, materialistic, rude, impatient, and act superior to others. Because this perception has been embedded into the minds of the locals for generations, chances are their immediate impression of you will be that of the haole.

With the knowledge that this truth exists on the islands, you can either opt out of this lifestyle or learn to embrace it. Learn more about the history and culture of Hawaii, and you'll develop a better understanding of why this attitude towards foreign interlopers is commonplace. If there's ever a slight against you, be prepared to respond with compassion, rather than reacting with aggression.

Although you're initially perceived as haole, you can still make yourself part of the “Ohana.” One thing that sets locals apart from haole is the idea of community taking precedence over the individual. Volunteer for community programs and projects that are of special interest to you. Get involved with the clean-up and beautification of parks and beaches. Sign your family up for dance lessons and sports clubs. Learn to understand “Pidgin” talk, but don't attempt to speak it.

A big part of the island lifestyle is taking it easy. Hawaii runs on island time, so if you're coming from a fast-paced part of the mainland, the slow-going attitude will take getting used to. The locals may view you as haole, and the Spirit of Aloha might not be something you feel right away, but with patience, kindness, and a good shaka, you will fit right in with the rest of the locals just fine.